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Horizontal divider Traci Gardner

Guess What I’m Thinking

posted: 9.16.14 by Traci Gardner

I had a disappointing, lackluster class discussion recently. I was asking students to apply details from the reading to a sample text I had displayed on the screen. I thought I was pitching incredibly easy questions to the class, but engaging the class in a conversation was anything but easy. [read more]

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Horizontal divider Steve Bernhardt

On Affirmations

posted: 9.16.14 by Steve Bernhardt

An important New York Times article has been circulating that focuses on questions of persistence in college. I called attention to it a couple weeks back on our new LinkedIn group College Writing Collaborative. (Join if you haven’t yet.) The lessons of the new lines of research as represented in this article are important for those of us who teach writing to first year students. [read more]

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Horizontal divider Andrea Lunsford

Newbs R Us!: A New Year and New Multimodal Opportunities

posted: 9.15.14 by Andrea Lunsford

Guest bloggers Jeanne Law Bohannon  and Kim Haimes-Korn are Professors in the Digital Writing and Media Arts (DWMA) Department at Southern Polytechnic State University. 

Excavating the Piles

“I remember a day not so long ago as I was going through old files in my office.  It was a trip down a memory lane as I reflected on former students, article drafts and student writing – lots of student writing.  As I looked back I realized that I have been teaching writing through a mulitmodal lens for many years.  [read more]

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Can Writing Be Taught?

posted: 9.11.14 by Andrea Lunsford

I’d be hard put to count up the number of times I’ve been asked this question, by parents who don’t want their children to have to take a “required” writing course, by administrators who don’t want to pay for writing programs, by colleagues in literature who often assume that writing arrives courtesy of the muse, and by students who think that they have learned all they could possibly need to know about writing in high school. [read more]

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Multimodal Mondays: “Getting to Know You” with Student Introduction Videos

posted: 9.8.14 by Andrea Lunsford

Stephanie Vie is an associate professor of writing and rhetoric at the University of Central Florida in Orlando. She researches digital identities in social media spaces and is particularly interested in how social media technologies impact literate practices both within and beyond the classroom. Stephanie works closely with the academic journal Kairos and the Computers and Composition Digital Press. In this post, Stephanie describes building an online learning community with an early multimodal assignment for an online or hybrid course: student-created videos. [read more]

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Splendid failures?

posted: 9.4.14 by Andrea Lunsford

William Faulkner considered The Sound and the Fury (1929) a failure, albeit a “splendid” failure. As he said in a 1957 interview:

I tried first to tell it with one brother, and that wasn’t enough. That was Section One. I tried with another brother, and that wasn’t enough. That was Section Two. I tried the third brother, because Caddy was still to me too beautiful and too moving to reduce her to telling what was going on, that it would be more passionate to see her through somebody else’s eyes, I thought. [read more]

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Whither the Apostrophe?

posted: 9.1.14 by Andrea Lunsford

People have been predicting the demise of the apostrophe for some time now, but when I began seeing cartoons about this little piece of punctuation, I began to think the end may indeed be nigh.  Just this week I ran across a cartoon depicting several people clustered around a large sign pinned to a wall.  The sign held one word—ITS—and in front of the sign stood a blindfolded person holding aloft an apostrophe with a pin through it. The caption:  “The games get pretty crazy at English teachers’ parties,” suggesting, of course, that the only people interested in apostrophes are . . . English teachers. [read more]

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Blogging as Pedagogy

posted: 8.21.14 by Andrea Lunsford

Colleague Adam Banks and students in our Bread Loaf summer course on Writing, Technologies, and Digital Cultures gave me a link to Silvia Rosenthal Tolisano’s blog, Langwitches, and specifically to a posting in which she argues for the pedagogical value of blogging. [read more]

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Horizontal divider Barclay Barrios

AMP’d for Teaching

posted: 8.20.14 by Barclay Barrios

We recently snagged a large grant from our school’s technology fee to outfit AMP, our Advanced Media Production lab.  It’s filled with geeky love including 15 high-end fully-kitted iMacs, a clutch of HD video cameras, a Livescribe pen, Final Cut Pro, Adobe Creative Cloud, and a 3D scanner and printer. [read more]

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Horizontal divider Steve Bernhardt

On Using the Handbook

posted: 8.20.14 by Steve Bernhardt

I’ll be visiting the University of Wisconsin-Lacrosse (and perhaps University of Minnesota-Duluth) next week to talk with their instructors about using Writer’s Help. Lacrosse was an early and enthusiastic adopter; Duluth’s decision to use WH was much more recent.

It would be a shame to adopt a book and not get good value from it, but I know that happens a lot. You may remember when we used to require that all students buy a college desk dictionary such as Merriam Webster’s (and many arrived with such graduation gifts for their dorm rooms), but we seldom did much with the dictionary. We presumed students would use it as needed. I don’t think that works. [read more]

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