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Horizontal divider Barclay Barrios

Discourses of Teaching

posted: 10.22.14 by Barclay Barrios

Today’s guest blogger is Jason Stephens, a native of Boise, Idaho who has recently moved to Boca Raton, Florida, where he is a first year MFA student at Florida Atlantic University. Jason has been deeply involved in bicycle touring since graduating from Boise State (where he earned his BA), which has allowed for a growing sense of importance in finding purpose for the self in all activities and interactions.

 Jason struggled with this post, trying to find the best ways to convey his felt sense that what he said in the classroom and how he said it directly affected what and how students wrote. [read more]

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Horizontal divider Nick Carbone

3 essays on rape and death threats against women in the age of #gamergate

posted: 10.21.14 by Nick Carbone

Online violence against women scares and worries me. As it morphs from virtual threat, which is bad enough and still violent even if not overtly physical, into offline threats that drive women from their homes, offices, and families and into hiding, the damage and danger has become palpable enough to make news. [read more]

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Horizontal divider Andrea Lunsford

Why teach figurative language?

posted: 10.16.14 by Andrea Lunsford

I have followed the work of Michael Chorost for a long time, since Brenda Brueggemann introduced me to his work on disability studies back in 2001. I will never forget reading the electrifying piece he wrote on losing his hearing completely and then, after having a cochlear implant and working diligently to relearn how to hear, experiencing once again the unforgettable opening notes of his beloved Boléro. Since then I’ve read his Rebuilt: My Journey Back to the Hearing World and a number of pieces he has contributed to Wired [read more]

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Horizontal divider Jack Solomon

A Digital Canary in the Coal Mine?

posted: 10.16.14 by Jack Solomon

Recently I received a student journalist’s request to comment on a phenomenon that she identified as a decline in traditional dating practices among millennials.  More specifically, she wanted to know what I think about certain “practice dating” groups that are forming to guide young people in how to behave during actual face-to-face dates.  “Why,” she asked me, “is there a growing need for practice dates, and why are millennials finding it harder to communicate face to face?” [read more]

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Horizontal divider Barclay Barrios

Vaguely Qualified

posted: 10.15.14 by Barclay Barrios

This week’s guest blogger is Katie Schipper.  Katie is a graduate student in the English department at Florida Atlantic University. She currently teaches two sections of first-year composition and believes in the value of writing as a means to express what we know and as a tool to acknowledge how much we have to learn. She also has two cats. [read more]

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Horizontal divider Traci Gardner

Snapchat Mashups

posted: 10.14.14 by Traci Gardner

I love “28 Snapchats From Harry Potter.” The BuzzFeed article compiles Snapchat-like images that mashup images from the Harry Potter movies with pop culture comments and puns, like the “Snapechat” image on the right.

Much like the Pinterest activities I shared two weeks ago, these Snapchat mashups would work as inspiration for the multimodal remix assignment students work on in the Writing and Digital Media course that I teach. [read more]

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Horizontal divider Susan Naomi Bernstein

Qualifications to Teach BW: Questions from the CBW Listserv

posted: 10.14.14 by Susan Naomi Bernstein

In a recent conversation on the Council on Basic Writing’s listserv (CBW), a correspondent asked about minimum qualifications for teaching Basic Writing. A listserv discussion ensued about appropriate degrees and necessary training. As minimum qualifications remain a long-standing question for the theory and practice of BW, we examined this conversation as part of our Teaching Basic Writing Practicum. [read more]

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Horizontal divider Andrea Lunsford

Multimodal Mondays – Fight Club and Social Media: Teaching Students the Importance of Conceding

posted: 10.13.14 by Andrea Lunsford

Eric Stephens is a graduate instructor at Utah State University. His research interests lie where popular culture, religion, pedagogy, and writing center theory and practice intersect. He has presented his work at several university symposiums and plans to present his most recent research at the International Writing Centers Association conference. You can reach Eric via his website and follow him on Twitter @eric_james86.

When I taught argumentation, the importance of conceding evaded my students. After some reflection, I realized I needed a new plan. [read more]

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Horizontal divider Andrea Lunsford

It’s Complicated!

posted: 10.9.14 by Andrea Lunsford

It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens is the latest work of danah boyd, who has been working on issues related to young people and technology since her graduate school days: she is now a Research Assistant Professor at NYU as well as Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research.  She blogs at Apophenia—I just read her recent thoughtful posting on the relationship between technologies and sex trafficking—and you can follow her on Twitter (of course!). [read more]

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Horizontal divider Barclay Barrios

How I Learned to Stop Worrying

posted: 10.8.14 by Barclay Barrios

My guest blogger today is Robert Curran, a graduate student in English at Florida Atlantic University.  He served in the Army in the field of military intelligence/interrogation but was injured before deploying overseas.  His hobbies include ghost hunting and watching cult films such as The Adventures of Buckaroo Bonzai Across the 8th Dimension.  While not traversing the state in search of poltergeists, Robert lives in Boca Raton, Florida, with his three-legged cat, Peg.

In this post, Robert meditates on the complex emotions connected to teaching—regret, fear, joy, worry, concern, and more.  [read more]

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